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TSSi is pleased to announce the release of its newest TACOPS® product, the M-10 Medical Backpack. Debuting at the 2017 SHOT Show in Las Vegas, NV, the TSSi M-10 Medical Backpack is based on the design of the TACOPS® M-9 Assault Medical Backpack but with significantly more internal storage space, more external PALS webbing to attach accessory pouches, new internal pouch options, and additional capabilities resulting from its increased size. Over a decade ago, TSSi designed the M-9 Assault Medical Backpack in conjunction with a U.

TSSi Introduces the M-10 Medical Backpack

TSSi Introduces the M-10 Medical BackpackTSSi is pleased to announce the release of its newest TACOPS® product, the M-10 Medical Backpack. Debuting at the 2017 SHOT Show in Las Vegas, NV, the TSSi M-10 Medical Backpack is based on the design of the TACOPS® M-9 Assault Medical Backpack but with significantly more internal storage space, more external PALS webbing to attach accessory pouches, new internal pouch options, and additional capabilities resulting from its increased size. Over a decade ago, TSSi designed the M-9 "Assault Medical Backpack" in conjunction with a U.S. Army Special Operation Command medic for his own unit’s use. It quickly became the medical bag of choice for special forces and civilian SWAT medics. As the diversity of M-9 end-users and operational missionsexpanded, so too did the amount of medical equipment that was being placed inside of it. Medics stuffing the M-9 until it “looked like a tick that was ready to burst” became the norm in many organizations. While still the operational medic bag of choice, its capacity was being pushed to the limit. TSSi’s answer to this common user experience is the M-10 Medical Backpack. Overall, the pack design has only increased in depth by just over 1 inch. However, the overall internal capacity has doubled with the expansion of the lower compartment by an additional 3 inches. The M-10 Medical Backpack can be ordered with a variety of pouch options for the internal layout as well as user-customized medical equipment load outs. For more information about the M-10 Medical Backpack or TSSi’s capabilities, contact a Sales Representative at sales@tssi-ops or toll-free 1-877 535-8774. – – – About TSSi TSSi is a Service-Disabled Veteran-Owned Small Business that has been providing specialized operational equipment and logistics support around the world for over 36 years. Their mission is to provide missionfocused, time-sensitive, value-added equipment and logistics services solutions, delivered with uncompromising integrity – anytime, anywhere. For more information about TSSi, please visit www.tssiops. com.

Survival: Then vs. Now (A Look Back)

Survival: Then vs. Now (A Look Back)

At Survival Cache, our contributing authors come to us with great ideas for articles.  Chuck has come across some old survival information from the early 1900’s that listed out gear to have in case of an emergency.  He has written a great piece looking back at the Bug Out Bag from a different era. Quick Navigation A Look Back A Look Back I’ve recently been looking into the B.O.B. (Bug Out Bag) lists from the early 1900’s and it got me thinking about the differences between how a survivalist from that era would design their Bug Out Bag compared to a modern day survivalist such as myself.   The products available today are quite different from the limited options of the past however the function and use-ability of the basic items remains the same. Some of the technological advances allow us to put together many similar items in our modern day Bug Out Bag to what our predecessors had but in a lighter more durable configuration.  I’m not sure that I can accurately tell you how the older generations would view my perspective, as I am a survivalist from today’s world.  The immediate threats to our predecessors were from different sources however the desired end result of the survivalist was the same, to be able to protect themselves and their loved ones either by repelling danger or escaping from it.  They also wanted to be able to continue to live and provide for their families in a situation where their common resources were scarce and in short supply. People living in our modern world have grown more accustomed to comfort and convenience and most of the products available today are geared towards making life easier for everyday life.  We have products like automatic coffee makers, flat screen televisions, self monitoring thermostats, refrigerators, TIVO, etc.  All of these things are great to have if your lifestyle and pocketbook can support them.  The drawback to having too many comfort items and the direction our modern day society has gone, is that there are too many people today who would not know what to do if all of these things were suddenly unavailable to them. The people living in much earlier eras had to rely on their own sweat and hard work to have the necessities they used everyday .  They had to get their own milk from cows (or neighbors with cows), pump their own water by hand or draw it from a well or stream, build a fire when they wanted heat, grow and pick their own food and often hunt, kill and clean the animals they wanted to eat.  These people were mainly living a life that supported all of their survival skills .  For them to have to pick up and move, although inconvenient, was quite a bit more manageable.  With the advent of electricity and the automobile things have changed quite a bit.  It has opened up a number of new options for people living in the areas where these things became readily available. As modern day survivalists, it’s important to remember our roots as a capable people, able to adapt and overcome any adverse situation that comes our way.  We can draw on the experience of our ancestors and look at their survival prep kits and compare it to what a modern day survival kit might look like.  There is no guarantee that we will always have the modern technological conveniences that we currently enjoy.  If we prepare for any survival situation that may come our way, we and our loved ones can ensure that we’ll be around to enjoy tomorrow, regardless of whether we can still see that new season of “Dancing with the Stars” on our flat screen TV. Let’s take a look at a 1917 Bug Out Bag List: (It’s a short one) -Small hatchet -Sheath Knife -Compass -Watch -Whistle -Maps -Paper and pen -Matches in waterproof container -Flashlight -Spare eyeglasses -First aid kit -Repair kit: small scissors, tweezers, dental floss, needle, safety pins, rubber band, shoelace, twine, snare wire, rigged fish line, hooks, split shot, etc. -Toilet articles: towel, soap, toothbrush, comb, mirror. Some of the current advantages that modern survivalist have are technology & science driven but are every bit as reliable as the tools available to earlier generations.  We have lighters , antibiotics, iodine, rechargeable batteries, solar collectors, ziplock bags, multi-tools, etc.  Although the following is not a comprehensive list for a Bug Out Bag it encompasses the essentials that I feel like I need to survive in a TEOTWAWKI situation in my home state of Maine (depending on the season).  The survival list for your Bug Out Bag will no doubt differ greatly depending on your geographic area and priorities. This is my modern day standard survival list: (From Chuck) – A good backpack – Fire starting tools (matches, bic lighter, blast master, flint and steel.) – A good sheath knife – Compass – Maps – Note pad and pencil – Canteens (or durable water bottles) – Flashlight – Spare batteries (8x AA, 8xAAA, 8×123) – Ammo for rifle and pistol (at least 200 for rifle and 100 for pistol) – Rifle and/or pistol – Sewing kit – Wire saw – Spare warm clothes , socks, underwear, pants, shirt. – Poncho – Cook kit – 50 feet Para cord – Tent – Sleeping bag – A durable outdoor watch – Toilet items (wash cloth, soap, toothbrush, toilet paper, toothpaste, and a razor) – A good folding knife – Gun cleaning kit with oil – A couple of books – I also have a couple of two way radios one for my wife and one for me. – Three handkerchiefs – Depending on the season, my snowshoes – A good axe – I bring Ziploc baggies to store fresh meat in or nuts and berries I find. – Multi tool(like a Leatherman, Gerber, SOG, or Winchester) – Fishing Kit – A good “Riggers” type belt – First aid kit- band aids, triple antibiotic ointment, medical tape, gauze bandages, tweezers, a small pair of scissors, iodine, I keep a septic pencil, and super glue. Compared to today’s standards of living that is not enough to live on comfortably.  Most people would agree that our modern day standard of living is geared towards things being fast and easy (convenience as the standard).  A majority of us no longer have to go out and milk the cow every morning for milk, or make our own clothes.   All we have to do is go to a local Wal-Mart or discount clothing store and spend about 13 dollars on a bunch of clothes that would have been a fortune to preppers living in 1917.  I‘ve had the honor of meeting people from that era and believe they were some of the most hard working men and women I have ever known.  My great grandfather was one of the last blacksmiths in the state of Maine and he would grab a double bitted axe by the handle, hold it out at arms length, touch the blade to his noise and say, “If you are a man you should be able to do that.”  I never knew what he meant till just a few years ago when I was talking to my father about this and he told me it was my great-grandfather’s way of saying, unless you try you never will know what you are capable of.  With this in mind, lets compare what we are prepping in our survival kit / Bug Out Bag in this era to survival kits in the past.  Will we have what we need when TEOTWAWKI happens? You might also like “7 Things You Need To Know About Bushcraft” Also read Chuck’s article “Web Gear: The Backpack Alternative” Photo credits: americansurvival101.com Other interesting articles: Survival Cache Podcast Episode 16: Ten Cool Survival Gear Items 10 Survival Blogs You Should Be Reading in 2020 (Updated) 5 Ways to Manage Bathroom Waste in a Survival Situation Car Survival Kit Guide: Design, and 15 Types of Gear

10 Best Rifle Slings Reviewed

10 Best Rifle Slings Reviewed

Now I have some of the most common slings on the market on the table. I have owned a couple in the past, but I’m primarily going to be talking about these. As you see here. I’ve got a couple of the tax lings. I’ve got a couple of mag pulls things. I’ve got the Hayley slang, which is relatively new and I’ve got the blue force gear sling. But I know there are some other ones out there, but I think these are probably the most popular. So we’ll be talking about these. Uh, some of these are two points, slings, some of these are three points links. You see no one point singers on the table because I just don’t like them. I think one point slings have their place for sure if you’re going to be doing a lot of CQB, a lot of change in shoulders, things like that. But these three points, things I feel like do just the same job and still if you need to go hands-on or just want your rifle to be slung for a long period of time, you can switch back to two points. So I think the three-point sling is superior. Now as far as two-point slings go, you’ve got a couple of options on the table. I’ve got the blue force gear here and I’ve got the V. the V tax language I think are probably the two best between the two. Let’s narrow down the two points links first and I’ll talk about why I like one over the other and then we’ll narrow down the three-point slings to whichever one I liked the best there and then I’ll give you my thoughts on which one’s the best overall, the Vtech sling versus the blue force gear slang. Now the blue force gear is a no-nonsense, no padding, nothing, just two points of contact that you can easily remove. One thing that you can easily adjust and that’s it. It runs about 45 to $55 the same price as the V tax like now the B tax link, you can get one of these. I have no attachment to cause I was using I think the sock mod stock and then I have a cutie Mount here. I prefer QT amounts on my slangs because sometimes I take them off to do reviews. Sometimes I don’t like a slang. Honestly on my home defense rifle. I feel like it gets in the way and then there are other times when you really want one, so it’s nice to pull it on and off as needed. Uh, the problem that I have with the V tax link is that there’s just too much stuff on it now. It’s got this adjustment. It’s a big and steel and I get that it’s supposed to be very durable. It’s got this pad and look at all this stuff. There isn’t an inch of the sling without a buckle on it or some padding or another buckle or another buckle. Uh, the adjustment tool to more buckles in the, in the acuity Mount. And the reason why I like that is that if you’re wearing a hooded sweatshirt or you have other stuff, other gear on you, body armor, a chest drink, anything like that, this one has a tendency not to move smoothly. And your sling moves around a lot when you’re manipulating your rifle. If you’re doing a reload, if you’re switching shoulders, be doing anything, swimming in and out of your slang, it’s important to know how to do that with a two-point sling. This thing has a tendency to get caught up on stuff. And honestly, that just irritates the crap out of me. And I know that if you’re a special forces guy or something, maybe you’re going to need all this adjustment. But for me the V tax slang is not the choice. I’d have to go with the simple easy to use, blue force gear slang if I’m going to get a two-point slang. So let’s get the V tax sling out of here and now on. One thing I have to say quick before I let it go is that I traditionally do not stand in one spot for a long period of time. With my sling on, I usually have my rifle slung for, you know, unless I’m in a class or something, usually an hour or less. So I don’t need this type of padding. But if you were to, you know, have your rifle on you all day and all night, you might feel differently about this choice and you might want this because even though it gets in the way a lot, I would have to say the padding is extremely comfortable. On the V tax link. So that’s one thing to know before I get rid of it. So we’ll keep the blue force gear sling on the back burner here and we’ll talk about the Magpole slings. I have two different types. I think I have the M two and the M three, and I have the Haley strategic slang. Even though it’s in the us to point configuration, it still does the or it still is a three-point slang. So what do I think better out of these two? Well, I would have to say between the two mag pull slings, even though I super liked the QD system, honestly this is so heavy and cumbersome. I mean I wish you could feel this and real-life compared to especially the Haley slang, look at the difference in the mountain system here. It’s heavy, it’s cumbersome and I’m just not a huge fan of it honestly. Now it is nice that you can take it on and off, but with the uh, with the H cake got clips or whatever you want to call them, they seem to work really well. I actually exchange this out for something totally different. I don’t know what the hell I was doing there. I think I was messing around with that at one point or another. I don’t know if I’d recommend this attachment point. I think I was trying something that I could move really quickly with. This doesn’t move quite as much. The downside of that is the Magpul attachment that you’ll have that goes with this makes a lot of noise. It’s a little chain link on an end of a little swiftly thing, I’ll, I’ll just annotate a picture cause I look ridiculous trying to show you what it is, but that makes a lot of noise. So that’s a downside. But the upside is it just feels a little smoother and maneuverability and it feels like it doesn’t squirrel around quite as much. But again, the problem with that is, is that these seem like they’re sometimes to get an on and off easily, and even though you won’t be taking this one on and off as much for three point slang, the benefit of it is that you can go from two to three so you’re going to want something that you could easily hook on and hook off and put back together. Now the reason why I wouldn’t suggest this little SF thing is because I’ve had durability issues with this. I tried one of these in the past and I’d bent this thing. So all in all though, the pros and cons versus the QT, the two different versions of this, I’m probably gonna go with my Frank and slim. So the QT version of the mag poles out. Now, I’d have to remember that both of these slings are a little bit different price. I think they range somewhere between 40 and 60 bucks. This version is cheaper. So the mag pull sling, which I believe Travis Haley designed versus his newest design, the D three slang from Haley strategic partners, I think, right? I think that’s what his company’s called. And what do I think between these two? Well, I would definitely uh, no competition go with the D three problem with the D three is that it’s twice as expensive as this Magpole the benefit is that they use super lightweight material. Now if you could feel the slings, you can tell that this thing is much higher. Quality is six. It’s a lot lighter weight. Uh, it’s just as durable. I’ve had it for quite a while. The attachments are much lighter weight as well. I know that he does a lot of rock climbing and stuff and he mentioned when he was talking about this product that he used a lot of different super-lightweight alloys and stuff from the, you know, the kind of the rock climbing world. So they’re extremely strong, extremely durable. They’ll definitely hold, if you clip these together, you’re not going to be pulling them apart. Even though the kind of this look of danky it definitely holds together. The other thing about it that I like is it does come with padding similar to what you saw on the vicars or sorry the V tack, but it’s not so cumbersome. I haven’t noticed any issues with snagging or anything like that. You’ll notice the rest of the sling is relatively smooth and easy to use as you can see as a, uh, as a pattern there that I really liked that I liked to the rifle to S to smoothly transition around my back and shoulder and stuff without getting snuck, without getting snagged on anything. So I like that a lot. I think as far as three-point slings go, this is the best. I actually think that, I think it’s the best out there. I know the savvy sniper slang is also a three points lane and it’s supposed to be extremely good. I haven’t tried that. Basically because of price. That’s something is very expensive. It’s even more expensive than this. In fact, I’m pretty sure it is and I just haven’t gotten around to getting it. I might get it someday and I would like to get it and compare it to this to see which one is better. And uh, when I saw all these other slangs I might get it. Who knows as far as right now the savvy sniper slang is still in the mix, but the best one that I own is the Haley D three. So this guy is out. Now this is a problem that I just figured out a couple of days ago, which is why I’m making this post. What slang is better? The D three sling or the blue force gear sling for me. Now this is only for me, uh, I would have to say I prefer the blue force gear slang. Uh, first off it’s half the price runs right between 40 and $60. This is somewhere between 80 and 90. I believe. I might be wrong on that. Uh, this is a lot lighter material and I feel like it’s made of slightly better material. It’s just more comfortable when you hold on to it. But I do prefer the dedicated to point slang. That’s why I said it’s personal preference because if you prefer a single, a two or three or what the option had, any sling that you want, you can go with this. Now the reason why I say I prefer this as a dedicated two point slang is because of this little attachment right here. Now this is a two to three-point sling, but when you have it in two-point mode, sometimes when you lift the rifle up to a, to uh, your shoulder to shoot it this or hit your right in the face. And I’ve had this get in between my stock of my rifle and my cheek. And you can imagine as fast as you can pull up a rifle and this hits you in the teeth or your cheek or something like that, it’s kind of a pain in the ass. And as much as I should say as little as I run a one point slang anymore, I don’t think it’s worth it for me to have this on my rifle because honestly the problems that I see with a one-point slaying, and again I’m not saying I’m not some super special forces operators, so I could be wrong here, but a lot of times when you’re transitioning your pistol or you’re just dropping your rifle here, any reason, usually it’s in the Dick and that kind of sucks and when you’re transitioning with a two point slang, it usually sets nice and comfortably beside you. The other thing is with a one-point slung is if you’re going hands-off, I feel like the barrel of the rifle dangles at your feet quite a bit and you know in areas where you wouldn’t want to shoot and with a two-point slang I feel like it stays a little more secure. Now both of these have the adjustment to where you can tighten them up. You want to put her in your back and tighten them up and I think that’s really cool. I think that in modern day time if you don’t have that adjustment you’re kind of behind the times cause it’s nice to have that. Especially if you’re going hands off for a long period of time tying out on your back and then you can undo it really easily and still use the rifle. Well if you’re switching shoulders and do a lot of tactical stuff, this might be your slang. But for me personally, I have used the two point slings longer. I like them better. I got to go with the blue force line or the blue force gear sling as my favorite slang out there so far. Now I think the savvy snipers link could still be in the running but I’m still willing to bet you I’ll prefer the blue force gear slang. I hope you like this. I know it’s a quick, not really rehearsed review but uh, if you have any questions or comments, if you really like one type of slang and I have in here that I didn’t give too much love, leave it in the comments below.

How to Build an AR-15 Lower Receiver: Trigger

How to Build an AR-15 Lower Receiver: Trigger

Our rifle build is shaping up, no? If you’ve finished with the pivot pin , let’s get that trigger installed. For reference, check the video embedded in this post (the time stamp below will jump you to the corresponding point in the vid) and the post where I laid out all the tools and components I’m using for this build. (10:50) Step 5 – Trigger I think you might be surprised at how easy installing a trigger is on an AR-15. All you will need for this step is the trigger, trigger spring, trigger pin, disconnector, disconnector spring and a 5/32″ roll pin punch . A little warning for you to consider as you get started: During the installation process of the trigger, do not, under any circumstances, allow the hammer to fall under spring tension against the bolt catch. This could crack your lower receiver. An AR-15 hammer should only be dry-fired with a bolt carrier group installed, or when you have your hand in front of it allowing it to hit your hand rather than the bolt catch. This is how the spring should look when installed onto the trigger. Now that that’s out of the way, let’s get that trigger into the AR-15 lower receiver. Position the lower receiver in the vise block like you had it at the beginning of this build . Start off by placing the trigger spring onto the trigger. Just place each side of the spring onto the “shoulder” of the trigger. When you drop the trigger into the trigger opening of the receiver, the legs of the spring should be curved under and facing towards the front of the receiver. Now take the disconnector spring, and place it into the trigger in the circular area that is cut out for it. Make sure that the big end of the disconnector spring is down in the trigger and the smaller end is facing up. If you have to, use a punch to push it down so it seats properly. Place the disconnector on top of the disconnector spring so the holes in the side of it line up with the holes in the trigger when you push it downward against the disconnector spring. Notice how you can use the pin punch to keep everything lined up as you push the trigger pin into place. Make sure that the trigger retaining pin is flush with the receiver on both sides. You can test the trigger for proper function by pulling it and making sure there is spring tension and that the disconnector moves with the trigger. Now that we have that all finished up, we can go over installing the hammer .

Ed Brown SOCOM Edition 1911 Reports For Duty

/* custom css */.td_uid_2_5f379d0cd4ae9_rand.td-a-rec-img { text-align: left; } .td_uid_2_5f379d0cd4ae9_rand.td-a-rec-img img { margin: 0 auto 0 0; } Built as a combat-ready custom 1911, the Ed Brown SOCOM edition runs long on tactically practical features. What the Ed Brown SOCOM Has To Offer: 5″ Government model slide Single stack government model frame with integral light rail Chainlink III treatment on forestrap and mainspring housing Traditional “square cut” American flag cocking serrations on rear FDE (Flat Dark Earth) Gen4 on frame, the rest in black Gen4 Black Nitride finished Suppressor ready barrel Trijicon SOCOM Coyote Brown RMR sight 3.25 MOA with tall night sights VZ Alien Grips Best Starter Kit for Concealed Carry: S&W M&P 9 SHIELD $394.96 guns.com Safariland IWB Holster $43.99 brownells.com Safariland Duty Belt $88.99 brownells.com SnagMag Ammo Pouch $LOW! gundigeststore.com Disclosure: Some of these links are affiliate links. Caribou Media Group may earn a commission from qualifying purchases. Thank you! It’s always a treat to see what Ed Brown cooks up. Running long on customization and features, the gunmaker's latest 1911 is no different. A tribute to U.S. Special Operation Command, the special edition SOCOM is made to excel in the harshest conditions. Though it’s such a slick looker, it’d be a shame to put a scratch on it. Related GunDigest Articles Gun Review: Ruger SR1911 Officer-Style .45 ACP The Training Advantage Of 1911 Conversion Kits Reviving The Hard-Charging MEUSOC 1911 Hand built, the 1911 has a few features worth particular note. Key among these is it's not only optics ready, with a milled slide, but comes decked out with a Trijicon RMR sight. Furthermore, the .45 ACP pistol has suppressor-ready iron night sights, which not only makes it simple to shoot with a can out of the box but also serves as a backup if the optic goes out. A few other points on the Ed Brown SOCOM: Government sized, accessory rail, threaded barrel, one-piece magwell, Chainlink III treatment on the front strap and mainspring housing and American flag cocking serrations. The gunmaker doesn’t exactly give guns away, particularly ones as long on extras as the SOCOM. So plan on scrapping up your spare change, Ed Brown put a $4,295 MSRP on the 1911.

Best Scope Mount For Your M1A Rated & Reviewed for 2020

The M14 was introduced in 1959 as an upgrade to the iconic M1 Garand. The upgrade included a 20-round box magazine and the switch from .30-06 ammunition to the less bulky 7.62x51mm (.308). The M1A is the civilian version of the M14, without the practically unused full-auto party trick. The M14/M1A was not designed to wear a scope. Nevertheless, the military has adapted a few versions of the rifle for wearing a scope. These include the M21 and M24 sniper systems. Besides snipers, these weapons are used by designated marksmen to give combat squads extended range. At a Glance: Our Top Picks for M1a Scope Mounts OUR TOP PICK: Springfield Armory M1A Generation 4 Scope Mount BEST BUDGET OPTION: Utg New Gen 4-point Locking Deluxe M14/M1A Scope Mount Aim Sports M-14/M1A Scope Mount, Small, Black Sadlak M14 Aluminum Scope Mount Comparison of the Best Scope M1A Scope Mounts IMAGE PRODUCT Our Top Pick Springfield Armory M1A Generation 4 Scope Mount Crafted by the OEM of M1A rifles - Springfield Armory Easy to install and durable single piece aluminum construction Pre-cut central part to reduce weight and eliminate ejection issues View Latest PriceRead Customer Reviews Best Budget Option Utg New Gen 4-point Locking Deluxe M14/M1A Scope Mount New gen 4-point locking scope mount for M14/M1A rifles Rear end locks into the charger guide dovetail Black rubber rail guards included for extra protection "View Latest Price" → "Read Customer Reviews" Aim Sports M-14/M1A Scope Mount, Small, Black Offers great value for money at this price Lightweight and sturdy design withstands pressure and tampering Takes less space on the receiver and works great for scouting View Latest PriceRead Customer Reviews Sadlak M14 "Aluminum Scope Mount" Manufactured from 7075 T6 Aluminum for strength and durability Solid mount and comes complete with major and minor accessories Great customer service for aftermarket support View Latest PriceRead Customer Reviews Why You Need a Scope Mount? The scope mounts available for the M1A are carefully designed to offer rock-solid stability. This is no easy task on a rifle that was not designed to be scoped. Installation of an M1A scope mount is usually more complicated than on the average rifle. Your stripper clip adaptor will have to go. However, a good scope mount will offer enough space to quickly reload your magazine by hand, without removing it from the rifle. M1A with mounted scope ( Source ) The .308 is an excellent long-range cartridge. It has countless sniper kills and long-range competition wins to its credit. To get all the benefit out of your M1A, a reliable scope is essential. As with everything about guns, this choice comes with trade-offs. Is your priority stability, weight, durability, or proven performance? The M1A is already a very heavy rifle, so weight is probably a priority. But lighter usually means less stable. Some mounts let you use the aperture sights as a backup without removing the scope. Types of Scope Mounts – Fixed vs. Detachable Scope mounts come in fixed or detachable varieties. Fixed scope mounts offer stability and accuracy over the long-term. They are for people who plan to only use their rifle with one specific scope for the foreseeable future. Fixed Scope Mounts Good fixed-scope mounts will keep the scope accurate even if you knock your rifle around a bit. You may drop it or bump it against a tree or a rock, but your scope should still hold zero. With fixed mounts, the focus is on reliability. However, you will need tools to bolt and unbolt them from the rifle. Sadlak Industries - M14/M1a Tactical Scope Mount Detachable Scope Mounts Detachable scope mounts have small quick-detach levers. You can flip them with your thumb to remove the scope in an instant. In general, this allows you to switch to iron sights or something like a red dot sight. Good detachable scope mounts return the scope to zero every time you reattach it to the rifle. Mounts that do this effectively are expensive. Springfield Armory M1A Generation 4 Scope Mount, Matte Black There are few, if any, detachable scope mounts available for the M1A. The fixed mounts available for the M1A usually feature a Picatinny or universal rail. You can find separate quick detach scope rings that come on and off that rail. However, the scope mount will still be in the way of any other sighting system. You could mount a red dot sight to the rail, but there are better ways to mount one. Features of a Good Scope Mount There are a few key features to look for in any good scope mount. First, the main purpose of the mount is to ensure your scope holds zero. It should do this even if you put your rifle through considerable punishment. This requires quality materials and a good, proven design. Steel is more trustworthy and expensive than aluminum. There are single-piece and two-piece mounts available. Two-piece mounts may make it easier to operate the action, while single-piece mounts are a better choice for reliability. The great benefit of a scope is that it can be accurate at a wide variety of distances, especially at longer ranges. A scope mount should add as little height as possible. The higher profile the sight, the harder it is for your scope to be accurate across various ranges. It also increases the need to raise the cheek weld on the buttstock. Some scope mounts do not place the scope directly centered above the bore. This limits accuracy and should be avoided. A scope mount should interfere with your rifle’s action as little as possible. There should be no issues with ejection or loading. Some scope mounts also let you use your iron sights without removing the mount or the scope. Quick Take - The Best M1A Scope Mounts These are our recommendations for the best M1A scope mounts: Sadlak Industries - M14/M1A Tactical Scope Mount Springfield Armory M1A Generation 4 Scope Mount, Matte Black Utg New Gen 4-point Locking Deluxe M14/M1A Scope Mount Review of the Best M1A Scope Mounts Not all scope mounts are created equal. Some have a long history of use with the M1A and some incorporate cutting-edge innovation. Here are our picks for the top M1A scope mounts available today. 1. Sadlak M14/M1A "Tactical Scope Mount" This is the ultimate M1A scope mount. These mounts are used by airborne forces on deployment overseas. They have a proven, reliable design. There are three versions. The best is the lightweight steel airborne model. If you find low-profile rings, you will probably not need to raise the cheek weld. Installation can be a bit complicated. It is vital to follow the instructions carefully. The mount is designed to compensate for out-of-spec receivers. Sadlak mounts are made in the USA by the Sadlak family. Buy Now Pros Made in the USA Three Points of Contact Does Not Obstruct Iron Sights Made of High-End Mil-Spec Steel Universal Rail (Picatinny and Weaver) A Proven Reliable Design Used by Airborne Forces Cons Instructions Must be Followed Carefully Bottom Line The Sadlak Tactical is the best scope mount for the M1A. None are more reliable. None offer the same flexibility. Besides, none offer the credibility of airborne deployment. The design is impressive, considering it offers so many benefits, while compensating for out-of-spec receivers. The steel mount is not light but makes up for it in ruggedness. Lightness and the M1A are rarely found in the same sentence anyway. This is a mount that will last a lifetime. When your M1A is handed down to your child and grandchild, the Sadlak will serve them reliably too. 2. Springfield Armory M1A Generation 4 Scope Mount, Matte Black It’s hard to argue against getting this scope mount. That’s because it was designed and built in the same factory as your Springfield M1A. It will also work on M1As from other manufacturers. If you want to save a few ounces of weight, this solid aluminum mount is a great choice. It sits a bit high on the rifle to ensure that it doesn’t interfere with ejection. You may have to raise the comb on the buttstock. There are many affordable ways to do this. This scope mount has two points of contact. Therefore, it’s a bit easier to install. It is still vital to follow the detailed instructions. This mount will not obstruct your iron sights. Buy Now Pros Lightweight Universal Rail Great Customer Support Made in the USA, at the Iconic Springfield Factory Cons May Not Fit All Scope Rings Requires Careful Installation Sits High, a Cheek Riser May be Required Bottom Line Some users complain about the mount’s alignment. This is usually because they did not install it correctly. Do not compromise when choosing and installing your mount and it will serve you well. The M1A was replaced by the M16 because it is a heavy rifle. If you want to shave a few ounces, this mount is for you. 3. UTG New Gen 4-Point Locking Deluxe M14/M1A Scope Mount This is another great aluminum scope mount with a universal rail. It features a relatively long six-inch rail with fifteen Picatinny slots. The design boasts four contact points, two of which lock. It attaches without obstructing the iron sighs. Installation is easy. You can find videos to follow on YouTube. If you don’t like the huge knob on the side, you can buy an alternative bolt. The UTG is made overseas and this keeps costs down. However, it shows in the tolerances and fit. The rail mounts low to the receiver compared to many alternatives. This means you probably won’t need to adjust the cheek weld. You probably should not use low scope rings. Buy Now Pros Lightweight Easy to Install Extra-Long Rail Four Contact Points Cons Made Overseas Poor Installation Instructions (Check YouTube) Bottom Line This is a solid, lightweight option. This scope mount offers great value for the money. Nevertheless, it will get the job done. Some of us are not particularly handy with mechanical tasks. This scope mount is a good choice for most users. It is also a great choice if you plan to use a long scope. Many users opt for the replacement bolt. It’s worth ordering them together to see which you prefer. 4. AIM Sports M-14/M1A Scope Mount This is another classic side-mounted M1A scope mount. It is made of lightweight aircraft-grade aluminum. The mount features a short universal rail. Like the UTG, this model is made overseas to cut costs. This means tolerances and fit may not be top of the line. Depending on your model of M1A, you may need to do some tweaking to make it work. It is, however, a popular clone of the Springfield Arms Gen 4 scope mount. You will need some skills and research to install this mount. It does not come with instructions. One option is to let a gunsmith do it for you. Buy Now Pros Lightweight Great Value Does Not Obstruct the Iron Sights Based on the Springfield Arms Gen 4 Design Cons Made Overseas Does Not Include Instructions Bottom Line Attaching this mount probably involves some tweaking, but that is typical for M1A scope mounts. This is a great option if you’re looking for value for money. Don’t be afraid to make any necessary adjustments. Not all receivers are up to spec. Designing a reliable scope mount for the M1A is an engineering challenge and the AIM Sports mount does a great job. The hefty aluminum construction screams reliability. 5. Sadlak M14 Aluminum Scope Mount This is the lightweight version of the Sadlak Airborne scope mount. It promises the reliability of the mount our troops take into battle, but at a fraction of the weight. Sadlak uses a proven, improved mil-spec design. It is made in the USA to the highest standard. Like the steel version, correct installation is not simple. Consider checking YouTube or giving the job to a gunsmith. Some users find the rail to be a bit too high. Consider playing with lower scope rings or raising the cheek weld to find your sweet spot to find the right fit. The mount is made in the USA by a family company. They offer great customer service if you run into any problems. Buy Now Pros Made in the USA "Proven Reliable Design" Three Points of Contact Does "Not Obstruct Iron" Sights Picatinny and Weaver Compatible Rail Cons Rail is a Bit High "Requires Careful Installation" Bottom Line The fit and finish on this model cannot be beaten. Neither can the weight for strength ratio. This is an improved version of the previously best M1A scope mount available. If you mount it correctly, you will not have any regrets. For an aluminum mount, this is as stable and reliable as they come. How to Assemble an M1A Scope Mount Offering a stable base for your optic is no simple matter. Every scope mount design involves its own compromises and innovations. If your mount is not correctly installed, it will be nothing but an annoyance. You need basic mechanical skills and specific tools to install most M1A scope mounts. These tools usually include a punch, bolt tightener, a small mallet, and Allen wrenches. If you have a torque screwdriver with bolt head attachments, that would be perfect. If you do not have these skills and tools, take the job to your local gunsmith. Most of the instructions that come with M1A scope mounts have over thirty steps. They often begin with removing the stock. This is necessary in order to remove the pin holding the stripper clip guide. Depending on your model, you will have to contend with various dovetails and tension bolts. It is important that all bolts are tightened enough without stripping the threads. Loctite is always a good idea. It comes included with some models. Best practice is to de-grease all bolt holes before you start. Some people will oil all contact surfaces (careful to avoid the bolt holes) to avoid rusting. Otherwise, make sure you follow the instructions religiously. Conclusion Scope mounts come with a variety of design features, but if they are not solid and reliable, they are garbage. Some users install theirs incorrectly and blame any problems on the mount. If you choose a quality mount and install it correctly, it will hold zero for a lifetime.

Summary

TSSi is pleased to announce the release of its newest TACOPS® product, the M-10 Medical Backpack. Debuting at the 2017 SHOT Show in Las Vegas, NV, the TSSi M-10 Medical Backpack is based on the design of the TACOPS® M-9 Assault Medical Backpack but with significantly more internal storage space, more external PALS webbing to attach accessory pouches, new internal pouch options, and additional capabilities resulting from its increased size. Over a decade ago, TSSi designed the M-9 Assault Medical Backpack in conjunction with a U.